What is meant by “woman” entrepreneur?

Vinay Agrawal

Discussing the misnomer of “women” entrepreneurs and why gender inclusivity in businesses is the need of the hour. 

When entrepreneurship is framed through the construct of gender, the harm outweighs the good.

The dictionary definition of an entrepreneur reads: “a person who sets up a business or businesses, taking on financial risks in the hope of a profit.” Let’s re-read it carefully with the attention of a seamstress working on a couture gown; the word-of-note and, in this context is, the “person”- a noun supposedly free from the trappings of gender. A person can be male, female, or an occupant on the spectrum lying in between these two dichotomies and beyond. So, when did the gender gain prominence and override the semantics-at-large? 

“While ‘women-entrepreneurs’ are aplenty, I am yet to come across such a prefix for the male counterpart. Entrepreneurship by design then becomes a masculine domain.”

While “women-entrepreneurs” are aplenty, I am yet to come across such a prefix for the male counterpart. Entrepreneurship by design then becomes a masculine domain. The divisions get widened further, and the idea of entrepreneurship being a male bastion gets reinforced and re-iterated birthing a fresh narrative of us and them, in which the women become the “others” who require to form a semantic coterie of their own irrespective of their will. The semantics percolate to the level of perception and the collective consciousness, often doing “good” on the surface, but fail to reach beyond the veneer. 

In an interview, Mamta Nihalani was asked, “How difficult is it for a woman to start a company?” To which, she replies, “… It is challenging…” She then makes another point that reads, “I can work late nights, can deliver what a job demands. I can manage my house and office; it’s about proving oneself every time, at every step and in any circumstances.” 

“The narrative thus gets derailed, and the focus shifts from ‘an entrepreneur’ to ‘the (woman) who is an entrepreneur.’” 

The narrative thus gets derailed, and the focus shifts from “an entrepreneur” to “the (woman) who is an entrepreneur.”  When we define entrepreneurship on the basis of gender, are we giving an agency to the women who’re averse to such descriptors and be rather known by their talent and gumption? In that situation, aren’t we boxing these women again in the confinements of gender? 

In an interview to ET, Kalaari Capital’s MD Vani Kola, says, “I don’t think it is about what we can do more, it is about just letting women be. We don’t have to do women any favour. We just have to remove the force of judgement— what happens if she has children, will it affect my investment, will others work for her, will she be competent. We just have to remove this attitude.”

Similar thoughts are echoed by Kanika Tekriwal, Co-Founder & CEO, Jetsetgo Aviation Services during a panel discussion, wherein she says, “On one hand, we are talking about equality and on other, we are asking for special status for women. This is not right. Instead of treating this mission of helping women as a sort of agenda, entrepreneurship should be made ‘normal’, for everyone.”

“In the course of interview/s, a woman-entrepreneur is often asked questions like, ‘but how do you manage business and family?’, ‘Are your in-laws okay with this?’ Such questions are rarely asked to the male counterpart.”

The title women entrepreneur often comes loaded with a certain set of performative expectations. “People started taking me seriously only when I got two male co-founders with their respective expertise in business development and finance”, says Vanita Prasad, an entrepreneur. In the course of interview/s, a woman-entrepreneur is often asked questions like, “but how do you manage business and family?”, “Are your in-laws okay with this?” Such questions are rarely asked to the male counterpart. Anyone working in journalism will tell you; the stark difference in the way a male-entrepreneur and a female-entrepreneur is pitched for stories and profiling. The gender-based pitching quadruples as the women’s day approaches and thins out, eventually.

If we’re so adamant in clinging to the “wokeness”, a gender-based prefix can bring in then why do we rarely see a “womxn entrepreneur”? Are we doing a colossal disservice to them? What about those who identify as “non-binary”, “gender-queer” but are slotted – and neatly classified in the category of “women entrepreneur”? In such a situation, not only do they get misgendered, but rendered more invisible and suffocated through an incorrect label. 

Parenthood & Entrepreneurship: Another Botched up Semantic? 

Before we move further, I’d like to ask you if you’re aware of the term, mom-preneurs. Put simply, this badge refers to a mom who also runs an enterprise. Let’s turn that term around. Do you know any dad-preneurs?.

“Constructing gender-based entrepreneurial identity around parenthood comes with its own set of issues. For example: If you are a mom-preneur, the first line of questioning pertains to your management skills vis-a-vis kids and business.”

Constructing gender-based entrepreneurial identity around parenthood comes with its own set of issues. For example: If you are a mom-preneur, the first line of questioning pertains to your management skills vis-a-vis kids and business. Depending upon the response, and after its scrutiny, one is placed at the various points on how “good” or “bad”, they are as a mother. If you’re lucky, you get a clean chit- and if you’re not, you are just not. But, a male-entrepreneur is hardly judged on such parameters. Joyce Shulman, the founder and CEO of the walking app 99 Walks and Macaroni Kid, in an article for Working Mother, writes, “how a top boss at an equity firm discredited her entire venture, calling it ‘a weekly email newsletter written by moms’.”

Towards A Gender-Free Approach

Is a gender-neutral term need of the hour rather than observing or framing the narrative of entrepreneurship through the brush of the gender?  A parent can be a man, a woman, or a womxn. They can be single, separated, married, divorced; heterosexual or homosexual.  How about an umbrella term, parentpreneur? In my opinion, it is an apt substitute and encompasses all. 

“‘women-entrepreneur’, in larger discourse, the seemingly innocuous prefix establishes ‘man’ as a dominant gender, and ‘woman’ as a subjugated one. In a few cases, their style, dressing sense, wardrobe and other so called visible markers of femininity becomes the talking point.”

Coming back to “women-entrepreneur”, in larger discourse, the seemingly innocuous prefix establishes ‘man’ as a dominant gender, and ‘woman’ as a subjugated one. In a few cases, their style, dressing sense, wardrobe and other so called visible markers of femininity becomes the talking point. I remember, once getting a call from a publicist, who pitched her client as a “stylish woman entrepreneur” ( and this was from a non-fashion space and hence unrelated ). The male entrepreneurs are however primarily pitched on the basis of their qualities and achievement- and rarely, in terms of the style. This implicit bias adds to the “pinkification of entrepreneurship” by suffusing a color and placing the attention away from the talent and back to the gender. 

“Summits, awards and conferences designed on such lines, amplify the existing notion, wherein at times the presenter for the award is ‘a male’. This just punctures the entire point and feels like an exercise in tokenism.”

Summits, awards and conferences designed on such lines, amplify the existing notion, wherein at times the presenter for the award is “a male”. This just punctures the entire point and feels like an exercise in tokenism. Carol Roth in an opinion piece for The Entrepreneur writes: “The constant segmentation of everyone by gender, race, age, or other qualifier beyond their control does nothing but create self-doubt for those who have been categorized as well as others around them. I was at a “women’s entrepreneurial dinner” held the night before a “women’s entrepreneurship conference.” I was asked what I hoped the future held for women entrepreneurs. I told the organizer that I hoped in ten years that his conference would be put out of business. Entrepreneurship should, and must belong to everyone irrespective of their gender. The larger question remains, whether we are short-changing talent by letting it pass through the codes of gender? 

An introvert by nature, Vinay believes in the strength and the beauty of vulnerability. He likes to read about arts & culture and has worked full-time as a features writer, and has contributed for various publications.

Design by Khyati Garg

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Busting Myths about Menstruation

Siddhi Shah

Discussing the myths relating to menstruation, why they persist and how we can challenge them

The word “menstruation” is often associated with adjectives such as anxiety, embarrassment, and fear. Despite being a natural bodily function, it is synonymous with myths and secrecy. In India, while we have progressed in creating awareness around it, menstruation is still a taboo. Myths around menstruation have contributed to serious consequences and misinformation in all peripheries, especially for those who lack access to basic resources like menstrual hygiene products and access to toilets. 

“Those who menstruate are prohibited from performing everyday chores. They are often asked to  purify themselves before resuming their everyday life.”

In India to date, menstruation is seen as something impure and dirty. Those who menstruate are prohibited from performing everyday chores. They are often asked to purify themselves before resuming their daily life. In many households, they are not allowed to do puja (prayer) or even enter a temple when they are menstruating. They are not allowed to touch and offer their prayers to holy books. Menstruating women are not allowed to touch anyone or enter the kitchen. They are excluded from activities and kept away from the rest of society. These practices exist and persist because of the backward cultural and religious beliefs that are propagated by society and passed on through generations. 

Menstruation is also linked to unaccepted cultural norms and traditions. It is said that it is associated with evil spirits, embarrassment and shame around sexual reproduction. In some areas, women are made to bury their clothes after they complete their cycle. The retrograde myth personifies that blood can be used as black magic and it can be used to assert the woman’s will on a man. The same blood from which a baby is created is considered impure. Studies show that about 71% of adolescent girls remain unaware of menstruation until they experience their first menstrual cycle. 

“Myths are nothing but sacred tales that have been passed on through generations as a means of making sense of the world and people’s experiences. It is an anachronism that myths continue to oppress a gender due to past experiences and thoughts.”

Myths are nothing but sacred tales that have been passed on through generations as a means of making sense of the world and people’s experiences. It is an anachronism that myths continue to oppress a gender due to past experiences and thoughts. Instead, they should foster a sense of equality especially when menstruation is biological and natural. Instead of women being empowered and feeling supported they are made to feel inferior, weak and abnormal. To name a few countries and their regressive superstitions around menstruation:

CountrySuperstition about menstruation 
The USA and the UK You cannot have a shower 
If you touch any vegetable when menstruating, it will rot  
NepalYou cannot be in your house or come in contact with anybody
Romania You cannot touch flowers, they will die quicker 
BrazilYou can’t wash your hair when you are on your period 
Philippines When you first get your period you need to wash your face with the first menstrual blood to have clear skin

“In Nepal, 14 million girls and women face challenges due to the restrictions imposed by their families. “Chauppadi”, is a practice which prevails in twenty-one districts. “Chau” means impure and “padi” means shed. It requires women to live in a cowshed or in a separate hut outside the house for five-seven days while they menstruate.” 

In Nepal, 14 million girls and women face challenges due to the restrictions imposed by their families. “Chauppadi”, is a practice which prevails in twenty-one districts. “Chau” means impure and “padi” means shed. It requires women to live in a cowshed or a separate hut outside the house for five-seven days while they menstruate. Girls and women are made to sleep on wooden planks without any basic necessities. This results in some of them being bitten by snakes and some of them are raped, harassed or murdered. In 2019 two girls aged 14 and 19 died because of a snake bite when they were residing in the cowsheds. 

These existing societal myths and taboos around menstruation have impacted the self-esteem of women. In less developed countries a lot of girls have to drop out of school when they start menstruating. This is because a large percentage of women face stomach pain or cramps during their periods and only 20% of girls are able to get medicine for cramps. 

“According to  NFHS (National Family Health Survey), 42% of women of the ages 15-24 use sanitary napkins, whilst 62% continue to use cloth.”

According to  NFHS (National Family Health Survey),  42% of women of the ages 15-24 use sanitary napkins, whilst 62% continue to use cloth. Moreover, lack of menstrual hygiene such as access to just 5-6 sanitary napkins for each woman for a whole month, lack of water or proper toilets in the house, and not being allowed to bathe during menstruation has led to serious health consequences like reproductive tract infections. Poor access to menstrual products continues to be a barrier to achieve complete coverage of menstrual hygiene. 88% of women in India have been recorded as using homemade alternatives such as rags, hay, ash and cloth. The question that arises is how we can put an end and take the first step for all girls and women to have access to menstrual hygiene?

“FullStopp is a student-led initiative that works to improve awareness, access and advocacy in the menstrual space aiming on achieving a more equal world.”

FullStopp is a student-led initiative that works to improve awareness, access and advocacy in the menstrual space aiming on achieving a more equal world. Anjali at the age of 16, founded this non-profit organisation. They conduct menstrual hygiene management sessions that outline certain do’s and don’ts, Biology behind periods and busting prevalent myths and superstitions to the underprivileged menstruators. In addition to this, they also provide biodegradable or reusable cloth pads as a more eco-friendly alternative to disposable plastic pads. So far, they have conducted sessions with thousands of underprivileged women at schools, slums, orphanages, sex-trafficking rescue homes, and NGOs across the country, and been able to provide menstrual products to cover over 75, 000 periods. Alongside running campaigns on social media, they have also been able to set up operational chapters in the UK, Algeria and Malawi.

Here are more suggestions on how we can overcome and combat these barriers:

1. The government must play an integral role in bringing a change in the system. Policies to promote menstrual hygiene by inculcating it in school curriculums is urgently needed so young children are aware and don’t blindly follow cultural myths. Menstrual hygiene education should be a priority. For example, the government of Goa introduced an educational module to encourage menstrual education and inculcate it in the curriculum. Low-cost sanitary pads should be locally made and distributed especially in rural and slum areas. In 2010, India launched a campaign called National Rural Health Mission to improve menstrual hygiene for 15 million adolescent girls and provide them with low-cost sanitary pads. 

2. Corporations and the media have the medium to change and mould perspectives in society. They should voice their opinions on gender equality and help break social taboos that still exist today in society. An exceptional campaign on menstruation was conducted by P&G. In 2014, it was one of the first campaigns in which any brand or institution in India talked about periods and it’s associated taboos on a large scale. It not only helped people talk about periods openly but also stirred a conversation as well as acceptance between men and women. 

3. NGOs and social organisations also could contribute largely to promoting menstrual hygiene in their communities. As mentioned above FullStopp is looking for volunteers to help them. You can also donate to such organisations to provide sanitary napkins to the underprivileged menstruators. 

4. The entertainment industry has also played as a catalyst in reaching out and educating people about menstrual hygiene. The film industry should create more movies like Padman and The period to make the conversation much stronger. Indian actor Akshay Kumar is a part of Niinemovement that has been conceived by social entrepreneur Tulsiyan in the ray of hope to inspire women, break taboos about menstrual hygiene and bridge the gap between sanitary napkin users. The documentary “Period. End of a Sentence” gained attention worldwide when it was recognised and awarded the Academy Award for best documentary in 2019.

All in all, these stakeholders should work together with their very own strengths to break the societal myths and secrecy associated with menstruation. Dealing with menstruation is difficult as it is and societal stigma makes it even harder. It is time for societies to come together to combat these beliefs. It is time for the colour red to become a symbol of purity and shatter centuries of myths about menstruation. 

Siddhi is currently pursuing Media and Communication from the University of Arts London. She strongly believes in bridging the gap in all societal aspects and cultures. She believes in gender equality and empowerment of the youth. She is also a music junkie who loves to travel and has her own fashion blog called Maisonsash.

Design by Hemashri Dhavala

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The Revelation of the Unspoken

Siddhi Shah

An insight into the UN Women Ad Campaign “the Autocomplete Truth” which exposed the stark gender inequality and discrimination that exists today.

Over the past decade, the way in which women are presented in the media has come a long way. With women-centric films and increased focus on gender equality by the government and corporates alike we have seen greater acceptance of feminism. However, there exists a deeply entrenched assumption and stereotype of a “woman”, as a mother, daughter, homemaker, or caregiver, who is responsible for the household.  

“The assumption of women as the one responsible for the household is further emphasised when advertisements related to cooking, cleaning, washing products predominantly feature women.”

This is because we live in a world that is surrounded by prejudiced visuals, imagery, and other representations that help us perceive our surroundings. A factor that contributes to the human lens and the representation of the worldly domain is advertising. It forms a vast superstructure within our human existence and has a major influence on our day to day lives.  The assumption of women as the one responsible for the household is further emphasised when advertisements related to cooking, cleaning, washing products predominantly feature women. In today’s time, it is important to curate advertisements that bring a positive change in society by addressing the issue of gender inequality. 

The United Nations organisation for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women or UN Women works for women empowerment by raising awareness of biases that exist against women and highlighting the long term imbalance of inequality. To address the issue with advertising,  it created a campaign called “The Autocomplete Truth” in 2013. 

“Google searches starting with “women should” depicted in the advertisement showed regressive attitudes about women and how they should be in order to be accepted in society.”

The Autocomplete truth was an exemplary campaign that provided insight into the discrimination that women face across the world. What made it unique was the fact that the campaign collated stereotypes that exist against women and responded to them. Google searches starting with “women should” depicted in the advertisement showed regressive attitudes about women and how they should be in order to be accepted in society. The search gave autocomplete results like “women should be in the kitchen”, “women should be slaves”, and “women should not have rights”. 

With the campaign, UN Women tried to highlight the sexism that exists even today. It challenged the higher social, political, and legal rights that men have enjoyed over women. Gender equality in terms of all peripheries is the major message that was emanated to the audience. 

“What stood out for me was the curation of the google search bar showing auto-completed results on the mouths of the four women, depicting how women have been silenced over the years”

I believe the UN campaign gave a voice and strength to women. What stood out for me was the curation of the google search bar showing auto-completed results on the mouths of the four women, depicting how women have been silenced over the years. It evoked the viewers to look at the grim reality of the prejudice and discrimination against women that continues even after decades of global progress on gender equality. It also showed how women are perceived on a global platform. Are women only supposed to be in the kitchen? Are they only supposed to serve men? Don’t they deserve the same rights economically and socially as men? 

“The Autocomplete truth had visibility of 755 million people globally and was tweeted by accounts of official authorities of more than 50 countries”

The campaign in the digital age created its trend with hashtags and left impressions online. It emerged victorious with 1 billion and 224 million impressions on Twitter. It also created #womenshould hashtag empowering women and acknowledging their achievements. The Autocomplete truth had visibility of 755 million people globally and was tweeted by accounts of official authorities of more than 50 countries. It became the most shared promotion of 2013 on Adweek.

The campaign got a lot of positive feedback. It had a profound impact that was reflected in headlines across the globe in leading news and media companies like CNBC, The Guardian, Times of India, Buzzfeed, and Cosmopolitan. The campaign also served as a helpful educational campaign for women empowerment. Companies such as Bajaj Allianz made a campaign after the hashtag to support UN women and it’s global equality purpose. This campaign served as an important medium to make consumers of internet media see that women are more than just being responsible for the household.

“The campaign made viewers question the culture of oppression that has persisted through generations”

The Autocomplete Truth campaign made viewers question the culture of oppression that has persisted through generations. It was positioned to provoke a widespread reaction from the new-age audience, to personify the positives of globalisation in society. It asked the audience what they were doing to make a change to the sexist perceptions of women that have been prevailing for years. In 2020, this campaign is still relevant as we see women across the globe bearing the burden of housework, along with working from home and being the primary caregivers. With Covid lockdowns, there is evidence of drastic increases in reports of domestic violence against women. It is important, now more than ever to look back at the Autocomplete Truth campaign from 2013 and challenge and question the inequality that persists today.   

“It’s time for each one of us to call out sexism at our workplace, educational institutions, and our homes”

I believe that the Autocomplete Truth Campaign revealed the patriarchal bigotry that has been encrypted in our society for generations. It has been a powerful attempt to challenge the power dynamics that exist even today. We need to build a  society in which women are equal to men in all situations and at all times. It’s time for each one of us to call out sexism at our workplace, educational institutions, and our homes. That is when the Autocomplete Campaign campaign will succeed.

Siddhi is currently pursuing Media and Communication from the University of Arts London. She strongly believes in bridging the gap in all societal aspects and cultures. She believes in gender equality and empowerment of the youth. She is also a music junkie who loves to travel and has her own fashion blog called Maisonsash.

Images from Ad series for UN Women by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai

Talking Periods Beyond Gender

Kanika Malhotra

Women are not the only ones who menstruate, why it’s important to go beyond gender when talking about periods.

An individual’s gender is not defined by their sex. Sex is a biological concept that, in this context, defines “male” and “female”. Gender is an individual’s identity separate from their biological sex. It is not determined by hormones or chromosomes. So, an individual’s gender identity may be different from the sex they are assigned at birth.  As explained by French theorist and philosopher Simone De Beauvoir in her book “The Second Sex”, one isn’t born a woman, “social discrimination produces in women moral and intellectual effects so profound that they appear to be caused by nature”, rather, one becomes a woman. The behavioural traits that may define men and women are acquired and are not pre-determined by anatomy. Gender is, therefore, not a direct consequence of an individual’s biological sex. 

“Menstruation is highly misunderstood when it comes to trans and non-binary individuals”

Menstruation is a biological function commonly linked to the female sex, however, it is not limited to cisgender women. The term cisgender is used for people whose gender identity matches their assigned sex at birth. It is also important to note that not all women with female reproductive systems menstruate, and that can be due to various medical and non-medical reasons. This assumption that only cisgender women menstruate is reflective of the lack of understanding and ignorance around the subject. Menstruation is highly misunderstood when it comes to transgender and non-binary individuals. Like cisgender women, they also, may or may not menstruate. 

J.K. Rowling’s recent transphobic tweet regarding menstruation, which received backlash and was taken down by Twitter, reflects this ignorance and bias that people have against transgender and non-binary identities. In India, transgender and non-binary people face similar prejudiced and ignorant comments. Speaking to Bol Magazine, Saral, a trans woman, explains that when she came out to one of her close friends they were shocked: “How is it possible? Aren’t trans people by birth?” This statement is reflective of how little people know about gender identities. 

“They are vulnerable to societal exclusion due to rejection of their avowed gender identity. This exclusion leads to violence against people of the transgender community”

The term Transgender is used to describe people whose gender identity does not align with the sex they were assigned, usually at birth and based on their genitals. They are vulnerable to societal exclusion due to rejection of their avowed gender identity. This exclusion leads to violence against people of the transgender community. If they choose to undergo a medical transition to change their primary sex characteristics, for instance, a person assigned male at birth and wishing to change to female, they may seek gender-affirming surgery or “sex change”. That said, they also face difficulties transitioning their sex. Gynaecologists often deny transitioning or charge excessively.  Moreover, there are not enough doctors or clinics providing  transitioning care.

A survey conducted in 2018 by the nonprofit organization Lambda Legal found that 70 percent of transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals have faced discrimination in a healthcare setting. The ignorance of gynecologists and general practitioners (GP) has resulted in misery for various individuals wanting to transition. “My worst experience, as a trans man, was when one GP refused to help me transition and said they’d do everything but ‘that’, like transitioning is a disease” says Math Blade, a trans man from the USA. He reflects: “My experience has been bad if I don’t have my beard, or if I am on the phone. Depending upon the clerk I get asked to get my husband on the phone. If they continually insist I throw my voice deeper, which hurts, and finish the transaction.”

“Representation of periods in the mainstream is always about cisgender heterosexual women. It has never been inclusive of any other gender”

Menstruation for cisgender women is a taboo in Indian society, and while periods have been recognised and represented mainstream, the same is not true for transgender individuals. They continuously face the stigma of people not accepting or understanding the fact that they may also menstruate, depending on what part of their transition they are in.

Representation of periods in the mainstream is always about cisgender heterosexual women. It has never been inclusive of any other gender. The education regarding periods is gender-segregated, taught only for cisgender girls by cisgender women in schools and in homes. Not only does this cause alienation but also creates an atmosphere of ignorance about menstruation for other genders. 

Being able to afford menstrual hygiene products such as sanitary pads and menstrual cups is a privilege in India. An article by Deccan Chronicle revealed that a person in India spends 300 Rupees (INR) on pads every month. That is nearly equivalent to 1,40,000 Rupees (INR) spent on pads for their whole life. According to a National Family Health survey only 57% of Indian heterosexual cisgender women in urban areas can afford menstrual pads at MRP (Maximum Retail Price). High costs and taxes associated with menstrual products also make them inaccessible for trans people, who may not be able to afford them. 

“accessing public toilets is another challenge, because of the existence of male and female only toilets”

Moreover, accessing public toilets is another challenge, because of the existence of male and female only toilets. Men’s toilets are not conducive spaces for menstrual hygiene and so trans men don’t have a safe space to change pads, or any other period product. There are no dustbins for disposal of pads. In some public toilets for men there are no private stalls. There are also cases of physical, verbal and even sexual abuse behind the doors. In 2016 in India, the highest number of assaults on trans people occurred in public toilets. Trans and non-binary people are denied spaces where they can change clothes, use toilets or change pads. 

Talking about the lack of access to toilets, Sonal, a trans woman, explains this issue: “During the pride parade I wanted to pee but I didn’t know where. Whenever I go out, I don’t drink much water. The biggest issue a transgender or non binary individual faces is where to go for a washroom, where? I have seen that whenever I go to a women’s washroom I have seen some discomfort in some women and we don’t even have the option of gender neutral washrooms, so where should we go?” 

“Menstruation, toilets, uniforms, and changing rooms need to go beyond gender”

Menstruation, toilets, uniforms, and changing rooms need to go beyond gender. Travis Albanza, who identifies as trans feminine, was denied access to a changing room in a TopShop showroom in the UK. They told buzzfeed that they wanted to relax and chill with their friends but instead their entire day became politicised.

Menstruation is a biological function. Creating a safe and accessible space for all humans who menstruate, regardless of their gender, is essential. This can be done by setting up gender neutral washrooms and changing rooms, and incorporating gender neutral language and more representation in the mainstream. School uniforms are gender neutral in Wales, UK. This  means that when a list of clothing items is published by the school, they will not be assigned to a specific gender. This helps non-binary and transgender children to feel included and safe. It prevents the imposition of gender on children. 

“Parents should ensure that they are allowing their children the freedom to figure out their gender identity. This can be done by not restricting their choice of toys, clothing or the colour of their room because of their gender, pointing out and correcting transphobic language, and not misgendering them by using incorrect pronouns”

Parents should ensure that they are allowing their children the freedom to figure out their gender identity. This can be done by not restricting their choice of toys, clothing or the colour of their room because of their gender, pointing out and correcting transphobic language, and not misgendering them by using incorrect pronouns. Always, a brand which sells sanitary products has made a decision to remove “Venus”, a symbol used to represent females, from its packaging in order to be more inclusive of trans men and non-binary individuals. Using words like “menstruators” or “menstrual hygiene” is another way to be inclusive. 

Transphobic minds cannot be changed overnight but everyone deserves a safe place for basic needs like using the toilet and access to menstrual hygiene products. Everyone deserves to be treated equally and with dignity and respect regardless of their gender, and that can be accomplished only through an active effort towards a more inclusive society.

Kanika is currently in high school in 11th standard. She believes in feminism and advocates for inclusivity of the lgbtqia+ community. Writing is a medium through which she expresses her opinions and takes a stand. Her other interests are skating and films.

Design by Hemashri Dhavala